Start a Business in West Africa!

We take care of the paper work so you focus on the rest. Our business registration process is fast, secure & affordable. It doesn't stop there! improving performance, converting risks into opportunities, developing strategies & creating value are the core of what we do which we accomplish  by creating a sustainable driven process, implementing tested techniques to improve productivity and maintaining best practices even after project completion.
Who We Are

East West Global Trade LLC is a Management Consulting Company in Minnesota. We are a social enterprise with over 35 years of experience working in the private and public sector across West Africa -helping enterprises achieve business objectives in record time. We provide enterprises in Minnesota and beyond with the expert help they deserve -whether you need to incorporate, deploy, improve performance and more – we can work with you to develop an effective strategy  for your business in the region. Call or email us to start the conversation.

Market Access

West Africa is a great place to invest but without proper and reliable local support, reaching business objectives in record time can be tough. Thanks to our vast network of experts, we can help you make the right decisions, maximize performance, minimize risks. Looking further ahead, we believe that the current crisis contains the seeds of a large-scale re-imagination of Africa’s economic structure, service-delivery systems, and social contract - accelerating trends in digitization, market consolidation, and regional cooperation creating important new opportunities—to boost local manufacturing, formalize SME's, upgrade urban infrastructure. Just as businesses and governments take immediate steps to strengthen health systems and restart economies, they are also planning ahead for West Africa's “next normal.”

Our Services

Strategy & Organization

Agribusiness & Agro-industry

Corporate Development

Accounting & Taxes

​Operations Management

​Finance & Banking

Marketing & Media​

​Legal Services

Human Resources

Procurement Management

Information Technology

Empowering the poor

Global uncertainty is taking a toll on growth well beyond Africa, and real GDP growth is also expected to slow significantly in other emerging and developing regions. The Middle East and North Africa, Latin America and Caribbean, and South Asia regions are expected to see even larger downward revisions in their growth forecasts than in Sub-Saharan Africa for 2019.

 

Beyond Sub- Saharan Africa’s regional averages, the picture is mixed. The recovery in Nigeria, South Africa, and Angola—the region’s three largest economies—has remained weak and is weighing on the region’s prospects. In Nigeria, growth in the non-oil sector has been sluggish, while in Angola the oil sector remained weak. In South Africa, low investment sentiment is weighing on economic activity.

 

Excluding Nigeria, South Africa, and Angola, growth in the rest of the subcontinent is expected to remain robust although slower in some countries. The average growth among non-resource-intensive countries is projected to edge down, reflecting the effects of tropical cyclones in Mozambique and Zimbabwe, political uncertainty in Sudan, weaker agricultural exports in Kenya, and fiscal consolidation in Senegal.

Image by Trevor Cole
Image by Fusion Medical Animation
Global Economic Prospects

The COVID-19 pandemic has, with alarming speed, dealt a heavy blow to an already-weak global economy, which is expected to slide into its deepest recession since the second world war, despite unprecedented policy support. The global recession would be deeper if countries take longer to bring the pandemic under control, if financial stress triggers defaults, or if there are protracted effects on households and firms. Economic disruptions are likely to be more severe and protracted in emerging market and developing economies with larger domestic outbreaks and weaker medical care systems; greater exposure to international spillovers through trade, tourism, and commodity and financial markets; weaker macroeconomic frameworks; and more pervasive informality and poverty. Beyond the current steep economic contraction, the pandemic is likely to leave lasting scars on the global economy by undermining consumer and investor confidence, human capital, and global value chains.

 

Being mostly a reflection of the recent plunge in global energy demand, low oil prices are unlikely to provide much of a boost to global growth in the near term. While policymakers’ immediate priorities are to address the health crisis and moderate the short-term economic losses, the likely long-term consequences of the pandemic highlight the need to forcefully undertake comprehensive reform programs to improve the fundamental drivers of economic growth, once the crisis abates.The COVID-19 pandemic has, with alarming speed, dealt a heavy blow to an already-weak global economy, which is expected to slide into its deepest recession since the second world war, despite unprecedented policy support. The global recession would be deeper if countries take longer to bring the pandemic under control, if financial stress triggers defaults, or if there are protracted effects on households and firms.

 

Economic disruptions are likely to be more severe and protracted in emerging market and developing economies with larger domestic outbreaks and weaker medical care systems; greater exposure to international spillovers through trade, tourism, and commodity and financial markets; weaker macroeconomic frameworks; and more pervasive informality and poverty. Beyond the current steep economic contraction, the pandemic is likely to leave lasting scars on the global economy by undermining consumer and investor confidence, human capital, and global value chains. Being mostly a reflection of the recent plunge in global energy demand, low oil prices are unlikely to provide much of a boost to global growth in the near term. While policymakers’ immediate priorities are to address the health crisis and moderate the short-term economic losses, the likely long-term consequences of the pandemic highlight the need to forcefully undertake comprehensive reform programs to improve the fundamental drivers of economic growth, once the crisis abates.

Mobile Money Recommendations

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about unprecedented challenges for the global economy. It has affected global health systems, affected peoples’ livelihoods and will leave long-lasting economic effects. Many countries have adopted partial or total ‘lockdowns’, restricting movement in a bid to “flatten the curve” and to limit the spread of the virus.

The role of mobile technology has never been more important than during this pandemic. The mobile ecosystem is absolutely vital in low- and middle- income countries in particular where connectivity and digital services can help inform citizens, design appropriate responses to the crisis, and preserve livelihoods. The GSMA is committed to supporting its members and partners through technical assistance, capacity building and best practice sharing.

 

In order to shield the most vulnerable user segments, governments and a number of mobile money providers and their regulators have responded with measures. How can regulators ensure that these measures do not impair the long-term sustainability of mobile money business? This document examines the impacts of COVID-19 on mobile money business and provides broad recommendations that could be taken to ensure business continuity and sustainability.

Image by Joshua Hanson
Communication Tower
Powering Youth Employment

Sub-Saharan Africa has the largest growing youth population in the world. This increasingly educated but inadequately skilled workforce poses a challenge for economies that must not only generate more jobs, but also support youth in their employment journeys.

 

Sub-Saharan Africa has the largest growing youth population in the world. This increasingly educated but inadequately skilled workforce poses a challenge for economies that must not only generate more jobs, but also support youth in their employment journeys.

 

​The mobile industry in Sub-Saharan Africa directly employed 1.2 million youth in 2018, and this number is expected to grow to 1.5 million by 2025. This growth will be driven primarily by increased network coverage, smartphone penetration and mobile services innovation, all of which are expected to create jobs by increasing demand for existing and new mobile services.

 

However, over two-thirds of these jobs will be in the informal sector, a challenge to ensuring decent and quality employment for youth. In this report, we explore the greatest challenge facing youth seeking employment in the mobile industry in Sub-Saharan Africa: the skills gap.We then explain how the mobile industry will continue to be a significant job creator for youth and unpack the role the industry will play in creating jobs, but also in supporting youth through their employment journeys.

How the COVID-19 crisis can catalyze change

COVID-19 poses a grave threat to lives across Africa, with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimating that the continent could see up to 190,000 deaths over the next year if the pandemic is not controlled.1 In the face of this challenge, governments have acted fast, both to strengthen the capacity of health systems and to contain the spread of the virus: as of May 19, about half of Africa’s population lives in countries imposing some type of lockdown. But despite accelerating case numbers and still-low testing rates in many countries (Exhibit 1), as well as recent reports of a worsening health crisis in hotspots on the continent, some governments have started to ease restrictions with caution as economic pain becomes more acute for households. 

Digitizing Agriculture Value-Chains

In agricultural value chains, a variety of steps and actors are involved in moving an agricultural product from a farm to the end consumer. The agricultural last mile is the web of relationships and transactions between crop buyers and farmers who produce and sell their crops.

 

The last mile is where global markets connect with rural economies, before transformation and value addition processes take place.Value chains have varying degrees of formality depending on the involvement of formal buyers, who aggregate and buy crops from farmers. As opposed to informal, middleman-based value chains that are characterized by a high degree of fragmentation, in the last mile, formal value chains are structured around agribusinesses and cooperatives that are responsible for crop procurement and aggregation. Alongside traditional value chains, agri e-commerce solutions are emerging as entirely new structures that are establishing formal relationships between buyers and sellers of crops through digital tools. Increasingly, agri e-commerce providers are developing procurement relationships with farmers to become crop aggregators.Formal value chains and agri e-commerce represent ideal entry points for mobile money providers to digitise procurement payments, as they provide strong incentives for buyers to increase transparency, quality and predictability of supply.

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Contact 

Bloomington, Minnesota,MN 55437

 Tel: 952-258-3288

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